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Arcade Games – the little machines that made it big

Arcade Games - the little machines that made it bigCasino games have been around forever. Archeologists even discovered ancient methods of gambling where natives would inscribe sticks with a certain amount of marks, bet on a chore or even a wife and throw them in the air to see the result. Obviously, since those times casino games have evolved enormously, but they are still around and going strong, and are probably gonna be around after your and I are gone.

One type of gambling that has stood the test of time and evolved in the meantime, is Arcade Games. The fact that they are still coin-operated goes to show that some things will never change if they work perfectly just the way they are. These entertainment machines, besides seen on the casino floors, can also be found in restaurants and bars and most often in amusement arcades.

Video games, electro-mechanical games, pinball, merchandisers with claws that catch your prize, and redemption games are all types of Arcade Games. Starting with the 1970 and well up into the 1990s arcade games suffered an overwhelming popularity among players especially in the West. The reason for their decline, but not demise, was the advent of the 3D graphics video game.

Believe it or not the first games to be considered arcade were the shooting gallery, ball-throw type of games, and the first machine was the fortune reading mystical one. The first coin-ops to first emerge in the 1930s were Pinball machines. By 1997 all machines of the like used solid-state electronics which made them easier to play and manage.

A big hit in the 1960 was the Periscope game invented by Sega, which was the first simulator type arcade game. It set the stage for the 25 cents machines to rise and was extremely popular in Japan, North America and Europe. Then Duck Hunt came up, again from Sega- obviously an innovative gaming company at the time, and this time crowds went wild because of its rear image projection technology that provided player with the amazement of moving animations.

Sega continued to gain popularity and so did the games released by them like Grand Prix, Missile, and Jet Rocket. By mid 1970s electronic video games started taking hold of the market and electro-mechanical machines were not in use so much anymore. Pong benefitted from notoriety in 1972 and Killer Shark, that also appeared in the movie Jaws, was all the rage at the time.

Finally, arcade video games were gaining ground and Atari was formed in 1971. They were also the ones to release Pong the following year. Arcade games reached a golden age in 1978 with Space Invaders, went through renaissance with 1990s Street Fighter II, and in 1999 revenues from these games had fallen so low that a decline was inevitable.

Today you can still play them, and yes the tech and graphics are other things all-together, but unfortunately there is a pitfall. These games are largely inaccessible to players that prefer gaming from home. As opposed to the games of the past, the new arcade games are geared to outlining the player’s skill level and method of play rather than put the accent on the content of the game specifically. So, if you’ve never played an arcade game by now we advise that you give them a try. Who knows? You might actually enjoy one.

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